…and the quest to see everything

Posts tagged “Mary Elizabeth Winstead

Overreading “The Thing” Prequel


Film versions of The Thing has graced our screens three times, seemingly coming in at the right decades when, as horror movies should, audiences see a physical manifestation of  their current fears. The monster in Hawks’ 1951 adaptation is supposedly about the communist threat while Carpenter’s 1982 remake is a metaphor for AIDS, so what about this year’s version?

There are multiple lines dividing the characters but the point is that they’re divided. This prequel tells us about the scientists who discover the alien before the Yankees in Carpenter’s film. Dr. Sander Halvorson (Ulrich Thomsen) appoints paleontologist Kate Lloyd (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) as his right hand woman for the Norwegian base in Antarctica  to study a ‘secret case.’ Let’s be cynical about Kate’s recruitment, and her own crew, the film’s screenwriters thinking that their movie needs anglophone actors for North American audiences to buy their tickets. The latent purpose of the subtitled Norwegian characters, however, teach us how to curse in their mother tongue.

Nonetheless, Sander might as well not have assigned for her, as the two scientists don’t behave as friends  outside of their professional boundaries. He also vetoes her warnings about the proper ways to handle the alien within its new, above ground environment. He inadvertently awakens the alien, the latter killing off a few of the base’s crew members under the guise of its last victim. Still, some of the survivors, despite themselves, still do not believe her conclusions and methods and we can’t help but assume that her gender and age factors into their unspoken prejudices. Thankfully, Winstead confidently asserts her character despite these intimidating men.

We also have to take into account the different nationalities snowed into one roof. A subplot involves Kate’s crew members Braxton Carter (Joel Edgerton) on a botched helicopter escape from the base and getting accused of being an alien when he takes the grueling walk back. One of the Norwegians who has stayed yells something like ‘The Americans are the enemy’ which is pretty subversive. Then we can go crazy with the over-interpretations, as circumstances pit Kate and Braxton against each other. Lloyd also believes that checking teeth fillings is the way to see which one of them are the aliens, showing class divisions within the crew. Maybe this movie isn’t confident enough to lift itself from Carpenter’s shadow but the ideas are there, especially in its chilling (ha, pun!) ending, where Kate and Braxton fall under their enemies’ hands. 3/5.


Scott Pilgrim: A Bibliography


Un Chien Andalou (1927) – Starting in one place and ending in another.

Looney Tunes (1930-1969) – Pointed out by Brad Brevet. Fight captions, as well as Scott leaving through the window.

A Star is Born ’37 – Lights on a cityscape far-ish away ?

The Lady Eve (1941) – Barbara Stanwyck reveals her many – fictional – exes to her new husband on public transportation. In the original graphic novel, Ramona does this on the Yonge-Finch subway train. Ha!

ph. Universal

Singin’ in the Rain (1952) – Goofball bursts through painted backdrop. Also, love triangle between histrionic and ‘intellectual.’

The Searchers (1956) – Roxy Richter is Scar and Michael Cera is John Wayne and Jeffrey Hunter in the same person?

Vertigo (1958) – John’s Ferren’s thin white whirlpool. [ETA: Also, zoom in dolly out when Scott and Lucas Lee run to each other and fight.]

Pillow Talk (1959) – Split screen, especially in phone conversations.

Richard Lester‘s films (1964 – ) Jason Anderson interviewed Edgar Wright who talked about four critics who compared the movie to Lester’s films.

Eraserhead (1977) – The white screen.

Hausu (1977) – Asian schoolgirls, one of whom is named Kung Fu, and thus, kicks ass.

Star Wars (1977) – I can’t believe it took me days to realize the swords. Fucking duh!

The Last Waltz (1978) – Sex Bob Omb plays empty room. Also, Young Neil looks like a young Neil Young.

[ETA] Hair (1979) Medium (?) close-up of Knives Chau’s (Ellen Wong) image panning from right to left just like the Asian girl singing ‘Walking in Space.’

Phantom of the Paradise (1980) – Evil rock band contract deals. Final fight scene in rock venue where, SPOILER, both men technically die.

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1989) – Scott apparently modeled between Ferris and the other guy.

“Seinfeld” (1990) – I didn’t know Jerry was gay. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Poison (1991) – A gay guy and a straight in sleeping in the same bed?

Riki-Oh (1991) – Hero fights hunks first before fighting skinny Asian dudes. What the fuck is up with that?

Dracula ’92 – Enemy evaporates at will?

The Big Lebowski (1998) Dream sequence portraying altitude and doors and love.

Rushmore (1998) – Dweeb in a love triangle between white girl and Asian.

American Beauty (1999) – But instead of roses, there’s a shower of hearts.

Fight Club (1999) – Protagonist fights many enemies and eventually has a fight with SPOILER himself.

High Fidelity (2000) – Pretentious CD store with rude customer service – the Sonic Boom people are nice, by the way – and movie about exes and the one true love.

Romeo Must Die (2000) – Guy uses girl to fight other girl, or the other way around.

ETA: Harry Potter (film series) (2001-2011) – Scott’s sister says ‘It’s been over a year since you got dumped by “she who will not be named.”‘

Gerry (2002) – Hazy desert scene. Dead white boy.

Phone Booth (2002) – By the way, there is no phone booth like that in Bloor and Bathurst.

“Arrested Development” (2003) – Apparently Michael Cera and the lesbian ex dated in a string of episodes.

Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2003) – Animation interludes depicting violent childhood. Also, fight between velvety voiced white girl and shout-y Asian. [ETA: Scott fighting Lucas Lee’s stunt doubles remind me of the Crazy 88.]

Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003) – Pirates are in this year!

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) – Dweeb hooks up with girl who changes her hair colour a lot.

Shaun of the Dead (2004) – MegaScott kinda looks like Zombie Ed.

The Fantastic Four (2005) – Chris Evans. Good actor.

The Last Winter (2006) – CGI air animals? We’ve probably seen this before.

Superman (2006) – The unrecognizable Brandon Routh.

[ETA] Juno (2007) – Michael Cera probably loses his movie virginity for the first time here.

Let the Right One In (2008) – The snow and swings. Also, ovaries > balls.

The Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009) – Jason Schwartzman kinda plays a superhero ?

Up in the Air (2009) – Anna Kendrick reuses her archetypal role as the younger but sane one.

Chloe (2010) – Movie about Toronto, awesome architecture, creepy phone calls.

Armond White is correct, okay? There are tons of movie references. If I wanna over-read these references, most of the recognizable are from movies made in the past decade, which means that these movies are worth referring to. Despite my pessimism, new movies aren’t so bad after all.

Yes, it underperformed at the box office, probably because of  apprehensions, as Peter Martin points out, that the references do target the ‘video game generation.’ The first reference I pointed out is from 1927. I don’t know if that helps ‘people over 30’ to be herded into the theatres, but if I could see a relationship to pop culture before video games, hopefully someone else will.