…and the quest to see everything

2011: A Dangerous Method

The title and trailer of David Cronenberg‘s A Dangerous Method made me assume that Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley) endures histrionic mental states and transforms into a seductress going after her psychiatrist-turned-lover Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender), making him unfaithful against his wife Emma (Sarah Gadon) and destroying his friendship with his colleague Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen). Fortunately it’s a more intelligent movie than that.

Knightley’s performance was always going to be imperfect, burdened in early scenes with a younger Sabina’s schizophrenia. Name me an actress who can go from laughing to crying to yelling within seconds while making us get used to a Russian accent, I’m sure you can. There’s bravery in her physical portraying Sabina, protruding her chin and bending her body, as if taunting her detractors who make fun of her face, posture and weight even when she’s looked her best. She’s an animal in the movie’s first scenes. But what’s fascinating is her great work after her spells, transforming herself as the dependent lover and intelligent student. And even if she shows Sabina’s insecurities and paranoia about relapses, when she’s in a room with intimidating men like Fassbender and Mortensen and forming and verbalizing theory, she commands these men’s respect as an intellectual equal and has enough stature in her frail body to get it.

Mortensen has great supporting work as Sigmund, showing the character as confident about his theories and flippant about the anti-Semitism that both he and, he assumes, Sabina faces. Vincent Cassel appears as himself under the name of psychoanalyst Otto Gross. But keeping Sabina in mind, and knowing that this sounds reductive, all she has to do is climb down towards relative convalescence. Carl, thus, is the most difficult character to play, Fassbender embodying the struggle between repression and sublimation that Jung struggles with within the decade-long time period. He also gives us the theoretical and emotional heart of the movie even if he makes us work for it a little.

I also sense the characters’ ambivalence towards sensing a bigger – that is the war – conflict that will arise out of smaller ones like the ones Jung serve in and his growing rift with Freud. The movie’s goodbye doesn’t have the same feeling of dread, but separating these three different persons – they haven’t been happy together anyway – signals how they are never going to be complete without each other. And that Sabina has made peace with that but Carl, who has perceived her, among many things, as his theoretical muse,  hasn’t.

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3 responses

  1. hi 😀 check out my blog http://haikumovies.wordpress.com/

    February 2, 2012 at 1:25 pm

  2. Yay for A Dangerous Method getting some love. It’s probably one of the films I’ve been harsher on than necessary even if I still liked it in my harshness (a B- from me is not something to shirk at). Of course, though, we can all agree that Keira is so lovely here. Okay, perhaps lovely is a questionable adjective…but I’m sure you understand.

    February 2, 2012 at 4:24 pm

    • Thank you for this. I feel as if I’ve been bitchy during my reviews since I started writing again (I have enough stuff ’till March). But I’m one of those people are fascinated by movies even if I think they’re a C+ or a C. The only bad things I say here are about Cassel and Knightley, but more about Knightley…

      She is more lovely than those puppies in those Sarah McLachlan ads. Not a perfect performance but I haven’t forgotten it since I saw it three weeks ago. And I will defend it and her to the death.

      February 3, 2012 at 12:32 am

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